Split Pediment

The musings of a Brighton-based architecture dweeb and town planner in training.

Tag: Split Pediment

100

Not that anyone’s been counting, or that there’s anything inherently significant about the number 100 to the contents of this here blog, but this is my 100th post. Cripes, some people do that in a week! Anyway, you already both know what you’re getting for this.

This rather fine pediment covers the grand entrance to Southover Manor, which was apparently built in the 1840s for a William Verrell (hence the “V”, obvs). The Verrells were serious stuff in Lewes (owning the still-impressive White Hart Inn) more about whom can be found out in this rather interesting blog.

The pediments of Birmingham

Longer posts will – eventually – be forthcoming following my recent trip up midlands. Meanwhile, a few of the curvy pediments of Birmingham:

Two split pediments, canoodling behind a hedge:

A nice bit of stonework, snugly supporting a friendly cherub:

A rather pristine swoop of terracotta:

Interimality

So I’m currently working on a big wordy post with plenty of pontificating about one of the towering giants of English architecture. That post is going to take a while (please don’t get excited – it’s self-aggrandising bunkum) so in the meantime, I want to tide you over with some contributions from some readers.

From Comrade Kimber comes this fine slice of Victoriana all the way from sunny Penzance. What thoroughly tasteful curly brackets; I like. Oh, and you needn’t worry – the palm trees aren’t in any way real (apparently there’s some cruel hoaxer in the far West of Cornwall who goes round with a few fake palms and wheels them infront of people trying to take photos. Dreadful situation.)

morrab-gardens-bandstand-110908

And then Ben the Ben has contributed this:

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which is a very nice curly pediment, though I’m afraid it’s already featured on this particular blog. Moving on quickly then. Ben the Ben also pointed me at this very interesting website.

So to all my readers, of whom there are at least two, I say ta. Guillemots Saturday – very excited.

Harlem Bonus

So the marvelous Auntie Bonus has contributed the following images of an architectural feature split impishly (in her words) from the Pilgrim Cathedral of Harlem (126th Street, in case anyone’s counting). The pediment itself is kinda cute – the dainty rim, scrolling up at the bottom; the little urns; the flat, empty central plinth; the stylised lotus flowers dangling from the high, swan-neck scrolls.

Cos they do this kinda thing stateside too

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It was only a matter of time

you see, it’s caught on. Those cute pediments are, as I suspected all along, simply irresistible to man or beast. The below feature was kindly donated by The Venerable Huntley and is a very interesting example. It has a lovely shallow ogee curve, large scrolls and barely a gnat’s whisker between them. I also like the flat arches over the ground floor windows, which – by their subtlety – emphasise the heaviness of the feature above the door.

Shallow Ped in Dulwich

Also in Dulwich (in fact, right opposite the very good Dulwich Picture Gallery) is this cunning little split ped. The rest of this large Victorian detached family home is all plain, sensible, understated brick with hardly any ornamentation. The porch, however, betrays a soupçon of self-importance. In fact I’d argue that the porch, with it’s pediment broken reservedly at the bottom (rather than the more theatrical top splits), is crucial for the overall impact of the house. Yes, we are proud of our home and want you to appreciate the importance of entering it, but we don’t boast about it. Yes (this façade says in a Brian Sewell voice) we know about history but we don’t rigidly adhere to a Palladian dogma or follow the diktats of fashion.

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Accidental Split

So here’s a not terribly interesting picture of a not terribly interesting wall of a not terribly interesting house in a not terribly interesting estate somewhere in the Dulwich area. But it does have a minor nod to the split pediment. It also has a squat roof, mean windows (“oh yes – let’s put windows two foot apart facing each other! And make them uncleanable! That’ll really bathe the upstairs rooms in a healthy glow!”) and Guinness-turd bricks. Nasty.

Scrolling split

Here’s a nice little split ped I spotted earlier today above a door in Kemptown. The whole doorway is great (and nicely grand for a side entrance) but it’s the details that I like.

Split Ped 1

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